WHY YOU SHOULD USE THE ENTIRE STROKE OF A V260CF HYDRAULIC SELF-LOCKING CYLINDER.

SHOULD YOU USE THE ENTIRE STROKE OF A V260 CYLINDER??

As a general rule, the entire stroke of a normal hydraulic cylinder should not be used. The piston should not hit either the head or the cap (taking as an example a tie-rod cylinder), because such ‘reduced’ stroke avoids shocks and jerks.

The V260, in fact, is entirely different: why?

  • Stroke out. In this case, if the rod doesn’t reach the outermost position, the locking sectors will not open entirely and the locking effect, which relies on them, will be poor or missing altogether. Unless the cylinder completes its full stroke out, it cannot be used efficiently.
  • Stroke in. here it is a little bit more complex. There are several reasons for completing the full stroke in.
  • First of all, if there is a rear switch, it will never be actuated if the piston doesn’t come back completely.
  • Secondly, in case the optional elastic safety seal is provided, it will not work. This device as well requires the piston to come back entirely.
  • Last but not least, in case the stroke is not completed, when the rod suddenly stops, some shocks can overload the inner parts of the cylinder. We took this chance into account after tests on the field. So, we are confident regarding our project and its capability of surviving such mistreatments, but, anyway, this is not the right way of using the cylinder.

In case the stroke required is different from the standard one, we can provide the cylinder with a longer piston, thus reducing the stroke. In this way, it’s possible to use the new ‘reduced’ stroke entirely, and let the cylinder work as it should.

In conclusion, please use all the stroke of a V260, and you’ll take full advantage of it and its capabilities.

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